Thumb big sb0122 kristywood

What I love about Serge Benhayon

I am someone who loves to observe people. For a long time, I had a great mistrust of people. I used to live cemented in a way to keep people at a distance. Meeting Serge Benhayon, for me, was the start of changing this and learning to see and let this pattern go.

What I want to talk about though is not so much my personal experience but more what I love about Serge Benhayon. I have known Serge for about six years and in that time I have watched him interact with hundreds of people.

One of the things I love to observe the most is when he meets people for the first time. He never holds them as a stranger and there is never that period of sussing people out, getting to know them or that formal questioning and assessing of each other.

I have never seen anyone else be quite this transparent and open with everyone they meet. When Serge meets someone he gives them everything – it is like they are a dearly loved family member. He is very open with everyone – he will embrace everyone in the same way – regardless of their religion, culture, nationality, gender, age or life choices.

When you see someone be met by him, all their guards and ‘normal’ patterns of engaging with others drop away, and watching from a distance, you get to see the beauty of the person come alive when they are held and embraced in this way. Their stance changes, the way they hold their body shifts and they often walk away more settled and fuller in themselves.

Recently I watched a 65 year old man share how he had this feeling that there had to be more to life, that he’d had a successful career, had been in relationships and had a group of mates but he felt like he was living these different boxes with all of these and sometimes these boxes conflicted with each other.

This man shared how he felt he could not be as open with his mates – that there was a certain way of relating and being with each other that they had. When Serge asked him whether there was a greater sensitivity that he felt that he had been holding back, the man said yes and shared about this.

You could see in this moment that he felt he had finally met a man who could meet him, accept and recognise this part of him. You could see for him, it was the breaking down of the false constructs that he had held for over fifty years of how he felt he needed to be as a man, and he felt more at ease with himself.

I also love that regardless of how someone is – Serge doesn’t change – he is the same.

He doesn’t hold back or drop the opinion he has of someone if they are having an off-day or off-period of time – he stays the same and brings an unwavering amount of love and understanding and never judges another for their choices. Serge just holds them in who he knows them to be, and many times over I have seen how people come back to themselves and out of the rut they have been in through being met with his consistency, love and support.

I can remember the first time I met Serge at a retreat, I had this idea that he would come out on stage and present, then you wouldn’t see him again. That in some way he would be separate to the audience. This was not the case. Serge is there with everyone – sitting in the dining hall, having a cup of tea with people and always making himself available when he was not on stage.

He is not a presenter that is untouchable – he is very with people, very connected to them and engaged in all aspects of life.

I have seen that this makes a huge difference to people as they get to know him not just for his inspiring works and presentations, but they get to know the man he is – the father, the grandfather, the husband, the friend, the brother and the very beautiful man he is who embraces everyone with his tenderness and love and never holds this back.

When people get to see all aspects of Serge’s life in this way, you can see it develops a great level of trust for them and this has been foundational for many people learning to really open up to themselves, others and life again.

Filed under

AppreciationLoveTenderness

  • Thumb small kristy wood

    By Kristy Wood, B.A. Education